Reasons to come to TWU17

With 30 days to go until This Way Up 17 in Hull, we’re excited to announce some of the new speakers, sessions and content you can expect to see.

SIMRAN HANS, KEYNOTE

Writer, researcher and film programmer Simran takes our 3rd keynote speaker spot and with an interest in ethics, you can expect Simran’s session to cover challenges endemic within the industry around fair representation, diversity, and balancing the business of culture with ethical practice.

DISCUSSION

Gaylene Gould (Head of Cinemas and Events at BFI Southbank) will chair a plenary session with all three keynote speakers (Simran Hans, Jenny Sealey MBE and Moira Sinclair) during which there will be opportunities to explore and discuss some of the ideas raised.

CATHERINE ALLEN IN CONVERSATION WITH TOM GRATER

VR producer, writer and tech commentator Catherine Allen, is passionate about the potential in tech for more equitable representation of gender, but also recognises the challenges that tech brings in terms of ethics. In this conversation with Tom Grater (reporter and deputy online editor for Screen Daily) they will discuss the potential and responsibilities of this new tech frontier.

DAVID ELLINGTON AND DUNCAN CARSON, BSL WORKSHOP – How can we make our cinemas Deaf-friendly?

The DCP revolution has made it easier than ever to offer subtitled screenings for the hundreds of thousands of D/deaf people in the UK. But there’s much more to making your cinema a welcoming space for D/deaf people than offering subtitled screenings. This session, presented by David Ellington of VS1 Productions, a Deaf trainer and director, and the Independent Cinema Office’s Duncan Carson will give you clear recommendations based on hundreds of responses of Deaf audience members. You’ll find out what you need to do to develop a thriving D/deaf audience, learn the key British Sign Language signs for cinemas and find out how to avoid the common pitfalls with D/deaf audiences.

TARA JUDAH EXPLORES EUROPEAN INNOVATION

Tara Judah, writer, blogger and broadcaster will hone in on some of the most interesting insights that came out of the recent Europa Cinemas Innovation Survey and the Tour des Cinema report, as well as talking with some of the case studies highlighted in the report.

TOGETHER FILMS: DATA, IMPACT AND MAKING THE MOST OF CAMPAIGNS

Sarah Mosses is the CEO of Together Films, a boutique marketing and distribution consultancy and in this session, Sarah will talk about how to ensure a film reaches the right audience, at the right time, on the right platform by creatively and intelligently using data.

PLUS

All sessions in the Main House will be signed.

Talk to us about child-care, we can help, click here to get in touch with TWU17 Coordinator Bex. 

MORE ANNOUNCEMENTS ON 13 OCTOBER. IF YOU HAVEN’T YET BOOKED YOUR DELEGATE PASS, THE TIME IS NOW! Click here.

30 Seconds with…JENNY SEALEY MBE

Name

Jenny Sealey

Profession

Theatre Director

Three words to describe your feelings about arts and culture

An Essential Necessary Human Right

What inspires you daily?

The people I work with.

What’s the most challenging thing about being in arts and culture right now?

Sadly in my world it is juggling the double whammy of standstill funding and cuts to Access to Work (a scheme supporting access for Deaf and disabled people in the workplace).

And, the biggest opportunity?

Artists, no matter what is going on in the world, will always find a way to make art.

What was the last film you saw?

At the cinema? Pride (2014) Matthew Warchus, at Dalston Rio because it is my local and it had subtitles!

Video on Demand: forces filmmakers to think differently or ruins the cinematic experience?

I can’t answer this re theatre but I am struggling with how much some theatre streaming costs – almost as much as a theatre ticket which feels very wrong given theatre is about being live! But I also do understand that theatre can get to people who cannot access it easily, however cost must be kept down as that is often the reason people don’t go to the theatre!

Positive discrimination: essential for the film sector or the wrong approach to gender equality?

The film and theatre world need to take a serious look at all of this… and casting.

Director / Talent Q&As: insufferably boring or a great way to give engage and develop audiences?

Depends on who the director is!

What are you looking forward to most about TWU 2017?

Meeting new people and learning from them.

What part of the TWU 2017 debate are you most interested in and why?

All of it as a lot of it is outside my comfort zone which is good for me.

Where can people find you online?

Jenny Sealey credit Micha Theiner

On Twitter: @GraeaeJennyS or online   www.graeae.org.

In real life, as a keynote at TWU17 in Hull!

30 seconds with…Laura Rothwell

Laura Rothwell is our resident marketer, last year she delivered our TWU16 marketing one-to-one sessions in Glasgow, and runs a marketing agency devoted to all things arts and culture. She gave us thirty seconds…

Name

Laura Rothwell

Profession

Marketing person, founder of Crystlsd, marketing for creative organisations.

Three words to describe your feelings about film/cinema/culture

For. The. Soul.

What inspires you daily?

Big ideas. Talking to people about their ‘stories’ and reasons for doing what they do.

What’s the most challenging thing about being in the film/cinema/culture right now?

From a marketing perspective, trying to be all things to all people, doesn’t work, can never work.

And, the biggest opportunity?

That there are so many new stories to tell to new audiences. We just have to tell them!

What was the last film you saw

Their Finest (2016), Lone Scherfig

Video on Demand: forces filmmakers to think differently or ruining the cinematic experience?

VoD is a necessary development in the market, the market is responding to demand. It is on filmmakers who aspire to the big screen to make the ‘big screen experience’ worth it. I enjoy Netflix as much as I enjoy visiting my local cinema (Tyneside Cinema). Different moods, different experiences, different demand.

Positive discrimination: essential for the film sector or the wrong approach to gender equality?
Right now?

Absolutely FREAKING essential. Across gender and ethnicity. It’s in no way acceptable that white men run boardrooms/film/production/everything else. (Nothing against white men, some of my best friends are white men).

Choose your own adventure films: an exciting development or will destroy the shared cinematic experience?

A fun fad that won’t last.

VR in film: enhances the experience for the viewer or negatively impacts traditional storytelling?

Can enhance, but doesn’t eclipse traditional storytelling.

Director / Talent Q&As: insufferably boring or a great way to engage and develop audiences?

I think they could be better delivered, and I think they could engage more people, i.e. thinking about what the barriers for audiences are and allowing the events to cater for that. For example, getting audiences to submit questions via social beforehand (or on paper before the screening) for the chair to ask, would probably improve the experience, by removing that ‘fear of asking questions’, thus more voices are heard and the discussion is more vibrant.

What are you looking forward to most about TWU 2017?

Finally getting to hear some speakers! Last year I was delivering workshops and had massive FOMO.

What part of the TWU 2017 debate are you most interested in and why?

I’m really interested in the places and spaces that culture occupies. I am wholly against the idea that culture exists only “in a place”, only in a gallery or museum or theatre, and I believe that those organisations must embrace the idea that their presence, influence and responsibility extends beyond their four walls; digitally, geographically, ideologically.

Where can people find you online?


On Twitter @notmacbeth

On Insta @lauramrothwell

Or, for more professional utterings: www.crystlsd.com

And of course, IRL at TWU17 in Hull!

30 seconds with… Annabel Grundy

ONE OF THOSE Q&A SESSIONS…

30 seconds with Annabel Grundy, part of the THIS WAY UP 17 team.

Name

Annabel Grundy

Profession

Arts Do-er, Producer, Developer  (currently co-managing Film Hub North)

Three words to describe your feelings about film, cinema and culture?

Beauty. Transcendence. Connection.

What inspires you daily?

The creativity and passion of Hub members – they’re all striving to create space and welcome places for culture, from the pop-ups & community screens to the larger venues.

What’s the most challenging thing about being in the film and cinema right now?

Ever reducing funding and ever-increasing KPIs.

And, the biggest opportunity?

Tech – there are literally new frontiers and ways of expression & storytelling being developed right now, which means there’s scope to hear some entirely new voices.  Also, tech is making it easier for anyone to become a ‘cinema’. A screen + passionate people + hall/field/cave/ (insert unique location here) to create all kinds of experiences.

What was the last film you saw?

Not quite a film but I saw the projected installation Waterlicht beamed onto Winnats Pass in the Peak District last night as part of AND Festival – it was ethereal, magical, and technologically exciting.

Video on Demand: forces filmmakers to think differently or ruining the cinematic experience?

Forces filmmakers – and by extension commissioners – to be more unique and aware of audiences, to create films and experiences beyond the everyday or that follow a homogenous blueprint.  VOD has brought threats, but there’s a huge case for diversity shown by the imaginative and new content coming from streaming platforms – who know people are watching it.

Positive discrimination: essential for the film sector or the wrong approach to gender equality?

Essential when it comes to public investment in film production or subsidized exhibition.  Beyond this, let’s see more work like that of Creative Federation, BECTU and Raising Films, highlighting issues for freelancers and parents in a gig economy.

Choose your own adventure films: an exciting development or will destroy the shared cinematic experience?

Sounds more like a game than a film to me.

VR in Film: enhances the experience for the viewer or negatively impacts traditional storytelling?

A different beast to cinema, as right now it’s a very individual experience.  I’m excited about companies like Magic Leap developing interactive AR worlds and environments to explore too.

Director / Talent Q&As: an insufferably boring, waking nightmare, or a great way to engage and develop audiences?

A fantastic addition to the cinema offer – vastly improved by having the right moderator and bringing lesser-known voices to the fore.

What are you looking forward to most about TWU17?

More in-depth sessions and room for debate and conversation.  Our Tuesday night drinks are going to be quite special too…

What part of the TWU17 debate are you most interested in and why?

Tech has a place in my geeky heart, but I’m most interested in ethics – part of culture’s job is to keep reminding us that we’re human, special, flawed, beautiful, with more to offer than the money spent on a ticket.

Where can people find you online?

On Twitter at @annabel__always

or at filmhubnorth.org.uk.

And in real life, at TWU17 in Hull this November!

Promotional side note: delegate passes are still available, click to buy.

30 SECONDS WITH… JOAN PARSONS

ONE OF THOSE Q&A SESSIONS…

Next up in our ongoing exploration of the thoughts and views of THIS WAY UP pals, colleagues, speakers and facilitators, Joan Parsons, of Showroom Cinema.

Name

Joan Parsons

Profession

Senior Programmer

Three words to describe your feelings about film and cinema

Essential. Political. Nourishing.

What inspires you daily?

My wonderful team, breakfast foods, tea.

What’s the most challenging thing about being in the film and cinema right now?

Balancing cultural ambition, commercial imperatives and personal satisfaction.

And, the biggest opportunity?

A chance to change the way the industry relies on opening weekend box office.

What was the last film you saw?

Beach Rats (2017), Eliza Hittman

Video on Demand: forces filmmakers to think differently or ruining the cinematic experience?

Potentially ruining the theatrical marketplace, having a lasting impact on audience taste and behaviour – however, more analysis and sharing of data is required to really gauge the effect.

Positive discrimination: essential for the film sector or the wrong approach to gender equality?

Needs careful consideration, at all levels. If audiences can be encouraged to apply to their choices, programmers to theirs, funders to theirs, training providers to their schemes. Positive Discrimination is a blunt tool to use when the industry is so complex.

Choose your own adventure films: an exciting development or will destroy the shared cinematic experience?

Gamification of narrative, where is the creative vision and powerful storytelling? I’ve no desire to choose a film narrative, I want it to grab me and take me wherever the filmmaker wants me to go.

VR in Film: enhances the experience for the viewer or negatively impacts traditional storytelling? 

Can be a nice additional element, however, this is a separate art form at fledgeling stages still so very reluctant to decide now before it has a chance to blow my mind.

Director / Talent Q&As: AN insufferably boring WAKIng nIGhtMARe or a great way to engage and develop audiences?

Some, of course, can be rather frustrating but when they work, they are a fantastic way to engage audiences with films, and filmmakers with their audiences. However, every time I hear “I don’t have a question, it’s more a comment…” I have major internal sighing.

What are you looking forward to most about TWU17?

Being inspired by other industries, thinking outside of venues, welcoming the industry to Hull.

What part of the TWU17 debate are you most interested in and why?

Basically everything! I think I’ll be watching the ‘Power of Culture’ and ‘Ethics and Resilience’ conversations very closely.

Where can people find you online?

On Twitter at @joan_parsons.

 

 

 

 

 

SEE YOU IN HULL!

30 Seconds With… Tara Judah

ONE OF THOSE Q&A SESSIONS…

As we approach THIS WAY UP 17, we’re checking in for 30 seconds only with some of our speakers, keynotes, facilitators, delegates and pals. And so without further ado, Tara Judah shares some thoughts…

Profession

Writer/Critic and Co-Director of the rare beast that is a video shop.

Three words to describe your feelings about film:

Love, empathy, striving.

What inspires you daily:

People who make time to come to the video shop.

What’s the most challenging thing about being in film right now?

People who think it’s dead.

And, the biggest opportunity?

The very real need for community and engagement – it’s not dead yet!

What was the last film you saw?

The Dark Half (1993) George A Romero.

Video on Demand: forces filmmakers to think differently or ruins the cinematic experience?

Neither. It’s just another of very many things bobbing about in the attention economy.

Positive discrimination: essential for the film sector or the wrong approach to gender equality?

Absobloodylutely essential.

Choose your own adventure films: an exciting development or A SCOURGE THAT will destroy the shared cinematic experience?

LOL. A (fun) flash in the pan.

VR in Film: enhances the experience for the viewer or negatively impacts traditional storytelling?

Neither, another thing that has its own place, maybe alongside, but not equal to cinema.

Director / Talent Q&As: AN insufferably boring WAKINg nightmAre or a great way of engaging and developing audiences?

It’s engagement and, like all things that call for engagement, it can work, and it can not work.

IMHO, just because all things can work, doesn’t mean they inherently will. Also, I’m not in the race to innovate for the sake of it, I’m all about engagement, passion, impact and effect.

What are you looking forward to most about TWU17?

The more conversational approach to panels. ❤️

What part of the TWU17 debate are you most interested in and why?

Ethics and Resilience – cinema, in fact the world, needs more love, equity and parity, which has a lot to do with ethics.

Where can people find you online?

Twitter: @midnightmovies

Instagram: @tarajudah

Or at tarajudah.com

LOVELY. THANKS, TARA. SEE YOU AT TWU17 IN HULL!

TWU17: Themes

Conference themes, thoughts and talking points

Remember to get your 2-day delegate pass here.

The 2017 edition of the conference will discuss key questions, setting debate and practical sessions against a backdrop of over-arching themes, outlined below:

THE POWER OF CULTURE

This year’s framing for the conference, in what feels like a period of increasingly dramatic and rapid change; in the film industry, in the country and across the world, where we’ve seen seismic shifts in politics, culture, society and business. The power of culture is colossal, its ability to be transformative, to inspire individuals and connect communities is essential. Held at the end of a hugely transformative year of cultural celebration in Hull, TWU will also examine the practical and wider potential for cultural activity to transform, renew, shape and even displace.

TECHNOLOGICAL CHANGE

A running theme since 2014, the conference will once again examine disruptive influences affecting the sector, new forms of exhibition and ways independents can capitalise on ever-increasing digitisation and accessible tech. New techno-industrial giants, such as Uber, Netflix and Airbnb, have developed so fast we’ve yet to fully understand their impact. How do we harness new technologies for good, and how do we use design-led thinking and embrace ‘disruptive innovation’ to suit our needs and those of our audiences? Delegates can expect practical demonstrations and the exploration of future trends.

ETHICS AND RESILIENCE

In the tumultuous 12 months since TWU16, TWU17 will ask where cultural organisation’s responsibilities lie in representation, programming, and inclusivity? With increasing pressure on arts to be ‘sustainable’ how do we preserve cultural values from the erosion of commercial pressure? How do we make the case for organisations to take risks, to ‘fail forward’ and to try new ideas? Whether it’s the chronic under-representation of women in the sector, or the #OscarsSoWhite movement, there is still a long way to go when it comes to the morals and ethics of our own industry.

PLACES, SPACES AND GLOBAL COMMUNITY

Cinema is at its heart a collective experience, and one of the art forms with the widest reach. As content proliferates across smaller and ever more portable devices, how does urban infrastructure make space for culture, and places that people can come together? Is there opportunity in digital space and how can we work with collective digitisation to create meaningful, communal experiences? Is a space made up of the people who inhabit it, or do we need to reinvest in capital to ensure future generations connect with culture?

TWU17: News on Programme and Speakers

KEYNOTE AND THEMES FOR THIS WAY UP 2017

Cementing its ambition with a revamped programme of timely discussion themes, the fourth edition of THIS WAY UP (TWU) – the annual film exhibitors’ industry conference – returns this Autumn (7-8 November), hosted by Hull Truck Theatre, in Hull UK City of Culture 2017.

As the BFI Film Audience Network develops, alongside renewed support measures for UK film exhibition, TWU will tackle the big questions and continue making the case for a diverse film culture. With attendance doubled since its first edition, the growing conference will build on three successful previous events, laying down new challenges and opportunities for the independent exhibition sector, and inviting delegates to explore, debate and discover new ways to move the sector forward.

Themes, conference MC and two of the three keynote presenters are now confirmed, with further names and other significant sessions will be announced in September:

Jenny Sealey MBE credit Micha Theiner

First keynote speaker to confirm is Jenny Sealey MBE, winner of the Liberty Human Rights Award and co-director of the London 2012 Paralympic Opening Ceremony, who has been CEO/Artistic Director of Graeae Theatre since 1997. A force for change in world-class theatre, Graeae is the original disabled-led theatre company which boldly places D/deaf and disabled actors centre stage. Challenging preconceptions and leading the way in pioneering, trail-blazing theatre, Graeae’s signature characteristic is their compelling creative integration of sign language, captioning and audio description. Their work engages brilliantly with both disabled and non-disabled audiences, champions accessibility and provides a platform for new generations of artists. A recognised authority in accessible aesthetics, Graeae works closely with client organisations to inspire and lead best practice – creating, supporting and advising on the development of accessible environments for all theatre lovers, everywhere.

Moira Sinclair credit Paul Hamlyn Foundation

Second keynote speaker is Moira Sinclair, CEO of the Paul Hamlyn Foundation (PHF), one of the UK’s largest independent grant-makers, which aims to help people overcome disadvantage and lack of opportunity. PHF has a particular interest in social justice and in supporting young people and has a strong belief in the importance of the arts. Previously, as Executive Director London and South East for Arts Council England, Moira oversaw a portfolio of 322 funded cultural organisations and contributed to national policy development, with a particular focus on the resilience and sustainability of the cultural sector and workforce development. She played a key role supporting the cultural programme for the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games, and is currently Chair of East London Dance and Vice Chair of the London Mayor’s Cultural Strategy Board. She is also a member of the British Library Advisory Council, of the Investment Committee for the Arts Impact Fund and of the Governing Council for the European Foundation Centre

James Mullighan

The conference will be MC’d by James Mullighan, previous director of the 58th – 61st editions of the Cork Film Festival, and the 65th Edinburgh International Film Festival.

James’ impressive resume includes working for;

Shooting People, RESFEST, Cinelan and HBO Europe, and he also serves on the Board of Encounters Short Film and Animation Festival.

 

Conference Themes

The 2017 edition of the conference will discuss key questions, setting debate and practical sessions against a backdrop of over-arching themes, which are:

The Power of Culture

This year’s framing for the conference, in what feels like a period of increasingly dramatic and rapid change; in the film industry, in the country and across the world, where we’ve seen seismic shifts in politics, culture, society and business. The power of culture is colossal, its ability to be transformative, to inspire individuals and connect communities is essential. Held at the end of a hugely transformative year of cultural celebration in Hull, TWU will also examine the practical and wider potential for cultural activity to transform, renew, shape and even displace.

Technological Change

A running theme since 2014, the conference will once again examine disruptive influences affecting the sector, new forms of exhibition and ways independents can capitalise on ever-increasing digitisation and accessible tech. New techno-industrial giants, such as Uber, Netflix and Airbnb, have developed so fast we’ve yet to fully understand their impact. How do we harness new technologies for good, and how do we use design-led thinking and embrace ‘disruptive innovation’ to suit our needs and those of our audiences? Delegates can expect practical demonstrations and the exploration of future trends.

Ethics and Resilience

In the tumultuous 12 months since TWU16, TWU17 will ask where cultural organisation’s responsibilities lie in representation, programming, and inclusivity? With increasing pressure on arts to be ‘sustainable’ how do we preserve cultural values from the erosion of commercial pressure? How do we make the case for organisations to take risks, to ‘fail forward’ and to try new ideas? Whether it’s the chronic under-representation of women in the sector, or the #OscarsSoWhite movement, there is still a long way to go when it comes to the morals and ethics of our own industry.

Places, Spaces and Global Community

Cinema is at its heart a collective experience, and one of the art forms with the widest reach. As content proliferates across smaller and ever more portable devices, how does urban infrastructure make space for culture, and places that people can come together? Is there opportunity in digital space and how can we work with collective digitisation to create meaningful, communal experiences? Is a space made up of the people who inhabit it, or do we need to reinvest in capital to ensure future generations connect with culture?

Building on Hull’s City of Culture year, which has included one of the largest programmes of film activity ever seen in the UK, TWU will examine the place of film and digital arts in wider cultural programmes and the power of film to reach and connect to diverse audiences. Having overseen hundreds of events across the city, Hull 2017 Director Martin Green will talk about the 365-day cultural programme, offering delegates an insight into the important role that culture has to play in transforming cities and the ambition to create a sustainable legacy for Hull.

Martin Green, Director Hull UK City of Culture 2017, said: “Film has been an important strand of our cultural programme. Thanks to BFI Film Hub North, Hull Independent Cinema and our other partners we have seen a vast array of film related activity, which has entertained us, offered commentary on society and a mirror on our lives. It has also opened-up opportunities for people wanting to be involved in this vitally important sector. This Way Up is a wonderful opportunity to share some of the things we have learned as a result of Hull being UK City of Culture and to look at the critical role that culture has in shaping our cities and benefiting the people that live in them.”

2017 Conference partners include: BFI Film Audience Network, British Council, Creative Europe Desk UK and Screen International (media partner).

Further programme details to be announced in September.

For Press Enquiries contact:

Clare Wilford PR, clare@clarewilford.co.uk, 01668 214923/07545 756462

This Way Up 17: tickets on sale

Buy 2-day Delegate Pass for £95

At TWU HQ, we are busy preparing for the fourth edition of the essential film exhibition conference, THIS WAY UP.

We are currently confirming our keynote speakers and programme information, but in the meantime, all you staunch-This-Way-Uppers can get your hands on 2017 passes for the Early Bird rate of £95, and for those who are yet to attend, we hope you can join us in Hull this year.

THIS WAY UP is the UK film exhibition innovation conference that promises to inspire and enlighten, provoke and challenge, connect and share.

With audience behaviour changing at an accelerating rate it’s more crucial than ever that film exhibitors come together to discuss the pressing issues, to hear about new models, new thinking and new opportunities and to meet each other to share our experiences.

THIS WAY UP offers a unique space where these questions can be addressed and (perhaps) answers will be found. Come and hear about the future of film exhibition before it passes you by.

THIS WAY UP 17 will take place at Hull Truck Theatre on Tuesday 7 and Wednesday 8 November 2017.

Click here to buy your delegate pass.